Journalists Receive Training in Use of HIV and AIDS Media Guide

Journalists Receive Training in Use of HIV and AIDS Media Guide
Journalists Receive Training in Use of HIV and AIDS Media Guide
Photo Credit: T. Lincoln Reeves

On Friday August 12, 2016 about 30 journalists and civil society organizations were trained in the use of Liberia's first HIV and AIDS Media Guide.  The 'HIV Guide for Journalists and Media Practitioners' is a handbook that gives journalists  ready-to use information on the various topics including Social Responsibility; Ethical and Responsible Reporting; Basic Facts of HIV; HIV Newsgathering, as well as Appropriate Terminologies for Effective HIV and AIDS Reporting.  The document was developed by the Anti AIDS Media Network with support from partners including the National AIDS Commission, UNAIDS, UNICEF, among others.       

The one-day workshop for journalists and civil society organizations was held under the auspices of the Anti AIDS Media Network with support from the American Jewish World Service (AJWS).  The program was hosted at offices of the United Nations Joint Program on HIV (UNAIDS).    

Welcoming the participants to the event, Necus Andrews, Coordinator of the Anti AIDS Media Network (AAMIN), said he was delighted to have partners coming together with the media to discuss the issue of HIV and AIDS.  Mr. Andrews emphasized that owing to the fact that the work of HIV  entails a lot of awareness, no HIV program or policy can be implemented without the involvement of the media.      

For his part, National AIDS Commission's  Communications Coordinator Lincoln Reeves noted that the media are very critical to achieving the mission of ending AIDS by 2030.  He observed that is why the National Strategic Plan 2015-2020 has a portion dedicated to the role of the media in the national response to HIV.    

Also speaking at the training, Dayugar Johnson, an official of the American Jewish World Service, pointed out that stigma and discrimination drives people underground but does not end the acts they are involved in.  He said his organization's support to the Anti AIDS Media Network is part of a wider initiative intended to counter stigma and discrimination against key populations and people living with HIV and AIDS.  He further explained that  the workshop is intended to ensure that information about HIV that will reduce stigma and discrimination reaches the newsrooms our media institutions. 

 Since 2012, the National AIDS Commission and partners have provided training to journalists to enhance effective reporting on HIV and AIDS.

On Friday August 12, 2016 about 30 journalists and civil society organizations were trained in the use of Liberia's first HIV and AIDS Media Guide.  The 'HIV Guide for Journalists and Media Practitioners' is a handbook that gives journalists  ready-to use information on the various topics including Social Responsibility; Ethical and Responsible Reporting; Basic Facts of HIV; HIV Newsgathering, as well as Appropriate Terminologies for Effective HIV and AIDS Reporting.  The document was developed by the Anti AIDS Media Network with support from partners including the National AIDS Commission, UNAIDS, UNICEF, among others.       

The one-day workshop for journalists and civil society organizations was held under the auspices of the Anti AIDS Media Network with support from the American Jewish World Service (AJWS).  The program was hosted at offices of the United Nations Joint Program on HIV (UNAIDS).    

Welcoming the participants to the event, Necus Andrews, Coordinator of the Anti AIDS Media Network (AAMIN), said he was delighted to have partners coming together with the media to discuss the issue of HIV and AIDS.  Mr. Andrews emphasized that owing to the fact that the work of HIV  entails a lot of awareness, no HIV program or policy can be implemented without the involvement of the media.      

For his part, National AIDS Commission's  Communications Coordinator Lincoln Reeves noted that the media are very critical to achieving the mission of ending AIDS by 2030.  He observed that is why the National Strategic Plan 2015-2020 has a portion dedicated to the role of the media in the national response to HIV.    

Also speaking at the training, Dayugar Johnson, an official of the American Jewish World Service, pointed out that stigma and discrimination drives people underground but does not end the acts they are involved in.  He said his organization's support to the Anti AIDS Media Network is part of a wider initiative intended to counter stigma and discrimination against key populations and people living with HIV and AIDS.  He further explained that  the workshop is intended to ensure that information about HIV that will reduce stigma and discrimination reaches the newsrooms our media institutions. 

 Since 2012, the National AIDS Commission and partners have provided training to journalists to enhance effective reporting on HIV and AIDS.